California Cannabis: Scams and Schemes of the Week, Part 2

california cannabis marijuana

Welcome back to “California Cannabis: Scams and Schemes of the Week.” We are publishing this series to shed light on the unscrupulousness of certain attorneys, consultants, and operators in the California cannabis industry, with the goal of establishing a more ethical and regulated industry in the state. You can find last week’s post here.

Scam #1: Attorneys Representing Buyer and Seller and Taking Commission

We continue to see attorneys representing cannabis entities on both sides of mergers and acquisitions, and in addition to taking an hourly rate, they’re taking a commission on the deal (from both parties)! We are seeing the same attorneys appoint themselves as counsel for the purchased corporation. We’ve seen some shocking deals that harm both parties and benefit only the attorney. Most often, troubling information about a business or property is concealed for the benefit of the seller and the attorney, to the detriment of the buyer. We often see good, trusting people get taken for a ride by attorneys with unethical motivations. The incentive to close a deal as quickly as possible to get a commission is at odds with the incentive to conduct careful due diligence. Make sure your agents and attorneys have your best interests at heart, and if a lawyer tells you he or she can represent “both sides” in a transaction, run!

Scam # 2: The $10 Million Plot of Empty Desert Land

We’ve seen some outrageous land deals in California. There are a number desert parcels without any improvements or utilities, in the middle of nowhere, being offered for millions of dollars. Due diligence is key in real estate transactions, especially in the speculative cannabis market. Just because cannabis activity is possible in a certain jurisdiction does not mean an empty plot of desert land there is worth $10 million. Supplying that land with water, electricity, and building out the structure is no small feat. Many remote desert areas lack the infrastructure to supply these parcels with necessary utilities, and the installation of such infrastructure takes many years and substantial cost. Beware.

Scam #3: Work for Equity in My Nonprofit! 

In California, no one “owns” a nonprofit. One cannot buy or sell a nonprofit corporation, and no stock can be issued or authorized by a nonprofit. We’ve discussed this before on the blog.

Still, we have people asking us to review equity agreements where their nonprofit employer is offering stock instead of salary. In some cases, the company offering these fake stock deals may not know any better because they’re being advised by incompetent attorneys. In other cases, however, these companies are knowingly taking advantage of employees who are blinded by the excitement of being part of a bourgeoning industry. Walk away.

Scam #4: Buy My License!

Under MAUCRSA, state licenses are non-transferable. According to 16 CCR 5023(c), if one or more of the owners of a state license change, a new license application and fee must be submitted to the BCC within 10 business days of the ownership change.

Most local cannabis permits are similarly non-transferable. And if they are transferable, most jurisdictions require you to obtain written approval from the local government prior to transfer. Keep this in mind if you’re looking to buy or lease a “cannabis approved” property, There is simply no guarantee you will be able to get a license to operate there.

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If you’ve come across a California cannabis industry scam, we would like to hear from you! Leave a comment below, or email us at firm@harrisbricken.com.

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Author: Julie Hamill

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