Canadian Branding and Marketing Regulations Will Impact Both U.S. and Canadian Cannabis Businesses

With implementation of Canada’s Cannabis Act (the “Act”) set for October of this year, many of our clients owning brands that will be sold in both the United States and Canada are beginning to wonder what the implications of new branding and marketing regulations will be. So far, more than 1,500 trademark applications for cannabis and cannabis-related products have been filed with the Canadian Trademark Office, and that number is certain to grow as legalization rolls out.

The Act, through its regulation of packaging, addresses many of the same concerns as certain state statutes in the U.S.: preventing false and misleading advertising and prohibiting advertising that is appealing to children. Some of the key prohibitions contained in the Act are on testimonials and endorsements, the use of real or fictional people, characters or animals, and branding or packaging that connotes “glamour, recreation, excitement, vitality, risk or daring.” Interestingly, there was discussion in the government’s Proposed Approach to the Regulation of Cannabis of implementing a plain packaging regime, something we’ve long suspected could be applied to cannabis.

The new regulations will require that all cannabis products be packaged in a manner that is tamper-evident, child-resistant, prevents contamination, and keeps cannabis dry. Packaging must be opaque. Pursuant to the Proposed Approach to the Regulation of Cannabis, licensed processors must label the package in which the cannabis product is contained in both French and English, and the following information would be generally required:

  • Name and contact information of the processor who packaged the product;
  • Product description;
  • Product lot number;
  • Product weight or volume, depending on the product class;
  • Packaging date (and expiry date, if one has been set);
  • Recommended storage conditions;
  • THC / CBD content (expressed as the percentage of THC / CBD the product could yield, and by unit or dose, if applicable); and
  • Inclusion of the statement: “KEEP OUT OF THE REACH OF CHILDREN”.

Under the Act, it is prohibited to promote cannabis in a manner that is false, misleading or deceptive, or that is likely to create an erroneous impression about its characteristics, value, quantity, composition, strength, concentration, potency, purity, quality, merit, safety, health effects or health risks. This aligns well with what we’ve seen in U.S. jurisdictions with regulated cannabis.

However, interestingly, the Act also prohibits promotion of cannabis brands using foreign media:

“It is prohibited to promote … cannabis, a cannabis accessory, a service related to cannabis or a brand element of any of those things in a publication that is published outside Canada, a broadcast that originates outside Canada or any other communication that originates outside Canada.”

This regulation could have serious implications for brands that are looking to position themselves not only in Canada, but also in other jurisdictions, including the U.S. The Canadian government has made it a priority to ensure that companies cannot evade the Act’s advertising and promotion restrictions by merely promoting the products abroad.

Sponsorship by Canadian cannabis companies will also be prohibited (perhaps even if a particular brand is only sponsoring events or individuals abroad):

“It is prohibited to display, refer to or otherwise use any of the following, directly or indirectly in a promotion that is used in the sponsorship of a person, entity, event, activity or facility:

  • A brand element of cannabis, of a cannabis accessory or of a service related to cannabis; and
  • The name of a person that
    • Produces, sells or distributes cannabis,
    • Sells or distributes a cannabis accessory, or
    • Provides a service related to cannabis.”

Clearly, the implications of Canada’s cannabis advertising regulations will be far-reaching once they are implemented in October. For brands that intend to have a presence in both the U.S. and Canada, it will be particularly important to ensure that no advertisements or promotions produced in the U.S. run afoul of the Act, as they could ultimately jeopardize the license(s) in Canada and open the responsible individuals up to liability. Having an understanding of how Canada’s rules will impact your brand, if you intend to expand beyond the U.S., will be critical in the coming months.

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Author: Alison Malsbury