Labeling CBD-Infused Foods in Oregon

label CBD hemp oregon FDA
Start from scratch with your CBD product labels.

Since the beginning of the year, our firm has received a growing number of inquiries related to the labeling of cannabinoids (“CBD”)-infused foods. This legal issue is particularly confusing given the fact that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) has yet to provide clear guidance for this category of products. This post aims to shed some light on the matter by addressing some of the requirements with which manufacturers and distributors of CBD-infused foods, specifically those derived from industrial hemp, must comply in Oregon.

Unlike the State of Indiana, which recently adopted the most stringent labeling rules for hemp-derived CBD products, Oregon opted to defer to the labeling rules promulgated by the FDA.

The Fair Packaging and Labeling Act (“FPL”) directs the FDA to issue regulations requiring that all “consumer commodities” be labeled to disclose net contents, identity of commodity, and the name and place of business of the products’ manufacturer, packer or distributor. Specifically, the FDA rules aim to ensure that foods sold in the United States are safe, wholesome and properly labeled.

The FDA rules provide two ways to label packages and containers:

  1. Place all label statements on the front label panel (also known as the “principal display panel” or “PDP”), which is the portion of the package label that is most likely to be seen by the consumer at the time of purchase (i.e., the front of the package or container); or
  2. Place certain statements on the PDP and others on the information panel, which is the label panel immediately to the right of the PDP, as seen by the consumer facing the product.

Although the FDA gives you the option of placing all label statements on the PDP or split them between the PDP and the information panel, you must ensure that the following label statements appear on the PDP:

  • The statement of identity or name the food as commonly known or used (e., chocolate, pasta); and
  • The net quantity statement or amount of product.

Due to the FDA’s ambiguous position on CBD, manufacturers and distributors should refrain from using the term “CBD” in their statement of identity and should favor instead the term “industrial hemp-infused.” (If you have been on Amazon lately, you will notice that everyone has moved over from the “CBD” to “industrial hemp” terminology.) Note also that the FDA rules impose strict font sizes and methods to accurately determine the weight of your product. Make sure you comply!

In addition to the statement of identity and the net quantity statement, labels will have to provide:

  • The Manufacturer/Distributor Information.
  • Ingredients List: Each ingredient must be listed in descending order of predominance (i.e., heaviest to lightest).
  • Nutrition Labeling, unless you qualify for an exemption, such as the “manufactured by small businesses” exemption which applies to companies that refrain from making nutritional claims and generate $50,000 or less in annual sales.
  • Serving Size.

Lastly, manufacturers and distributors should abstain from making any health claims in fear of being investigated by the FDA which treats products with labels containing health claims as drugs, not food (see here and here more information on this issue). Sometimes, “health claims” can be a fine line, so you should assume that the FDA is going to take a restrictive view of what you can and cannot say.

Although the FDA does not impose a pre-approval process of food labels, manufacturers and distributors of CBD-infused foods should have their labels reviewed by an attorney before they enter the market. Relying on attorneys who are well-versed on the issue of CBD law will ensures compliance with the FDA rules, but also help manufactures and distributors avoid wasting money on reprinting labels and marketing materials.

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Author: Nathalie Bougenies
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