Oregon OSHA and Your Cannabis Business

Oregon safety marijauana
The OSHA model. And a good look for cannabis business.

So, what is Oregon OSHA (“OR OSHA”)?

OR OSHA is the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Act. This law requires employers to “furnish employment and a place of employment which are safe and healthful for employees.” In other words, employers are required to maintain safe workplaces. This means that employers are required to identify potential workplace hazards, prevent such hazards, and provide safety measures to employees to protect their health and safety, in all situations where hazards are inherent in the job or otherwise unavoidable. Does this law apply to cannabis employers? You bet.

OR OSHA also identifies certain conditions as inherently hazardous or unsafe, and regulates the condition or practice by imposing employer requirements to mitigate the condition or practice (think fall protection when on a ladder). The kind of marijuana business you run will dictate what OR OSHA regulations are triggered.

For example: marijuana producers are subject to the OSHA agricultural rules. These rules require employers to protect employees from things such as machine hazards, mold, electrical hazards, and heat exposure, among other things agricultural employees are subject to.  Marijuana processors must comply with special requirements for employees handling extraction chemicals. Retail operators must ensure employees are safe from slips, trips, and falls. Etc.

In addition to protecting employees from hazards at work, OSHA imposes reporting requirements on employers. Employers must report to OR OSHA within eight hours epodes like the death of an employee or a catastrophe. A catastrophe is defined as two or more employees fatally injured or three or more employees admitted to a hospital or an equivalent medical facility. Employers must report to OR OSHA within 24 hour of any employee being hospitalized, losing an eye or an amputation, or avulsion that results in bone loss. In addition to these reporting requirements, employers with 10 or more employees must record their injuries and illnesses that are a result of the work environment on a form called the OSHA 300 Log. Employers must also summarize the 300 log on a form called an OSHA 300-A.

Somewhat similar to the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (“OLCC”) — which is the state agency that administers marijuana licenses — OR OSHA has the power to investigate employers to determine whether or not they are compliant with OSHA requirements. OR OSHA does not have to provide advance notice of inspections, and the agency may randomly show up at an employer’s place of business to conduct an inspection.

So where might the agency show up? OR OSHA prioritizes inspections at locations that are determined to be the most unsafe. An OR OSHA investigator will investigate the employer’s property to determine if there are any violations. If there are violations, the investigator can issue a citation based on the type of violation. As with OLCC citation powers, the type of penalty associated with the citation depends on how serious the violation is.

OR OSHA safety requirements are comprehensive. The agency encourages employer compliance and has a series of free tools available to employers to assist with that compliance. OR OSHA’s most significant tool is its consultation services. Free of charge, an OSHA consultant will inspect a work site and provide safety, health, and ergonomic hazard assessments, recommendations to control and eliminate hazards, a written program evaluation, industrial hygiene services, training on health and safety topics, and assistance with safety and health programs. In short, a consultant will come out and point out potential OSHA violations and provide a plan to help with compliance.

Pro tip: A consultant is a great and free way to assess your compliance with OSHA prior to an inspector coming to your place of business.

Like with most employer regulations, compliance in the first place is the best way to avoid a hefty civil penalty or litigation. However, citations happen even when the best intentions are in place. This post has only scratched the surface of OSHA requirements. If you have additional questions, give us a call.

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Author: Megan Vaniman